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May 18, 2017

5 Reasons to choose Crete for your Summer Holiday

5 Reasons to choose Crete for your Summer Holiday

The summer holidays are fast approaching and with so many beautiful holiday destinations to visit, it can be overwhelming and difficult to choose. One of the most popular destinations for travelling is Crete. Being the largest of the Greek islands, it truly offers everything a holidaymaker could ever need for a perfect summer holiday.

Agios Nikolaos - Lake Voulismeni,, Crete - photo Artemiy Pavlov

Agios Nikolaos – Lake Voulismeni – Crete: photo Artemiy Pavlov

Here are 5 reasons why Crete should be your next summer holiday destination:

 1.  The Gorgeous Mediterranean Climate

Beach in Crete, Greece

Cretan Beach

Located between the Mediterranean and North African climate zones, Crete offers a warm and dry climate that is moderated with refreshingly cool sea breezes. Being bathed in the warm sunlight throughout most of the year, Crete is known to have one of the best climates in Europe. The sunshine is in no short supply whilst rainfall is nowhere to be found during summer, making this a popular all-inclusive summer holiday destination.

2. A Huge Variety of Activities

Heraklion Archaeology Museum Crete

Heraklion Archaeology Museum

Crete, the largest of the Greek islands, offers plenty of natural wonders to explore and a variety of popular resorts to indulge in. Forming a significant part of the cultural heritage of Greece, this island is brimming with fascinating culture and history. For family activities, take a trip down to the Heraklion Archaeological Museum to experience one of Europe’s most fascinating museums. This museum covers over 5,500 years of the island’s impressive history. Head east to experience the mesmerising sea-life at the Aquaworld Aquarium in Hersonissos.  Enjoy a relaxing day and admire the gorgeous sea-life, reptiles and rescued animals.

Agios Nikolaos resort is best known for its impressive range of activities. It’s a splendid lagoon with golden beaches, plenty of water sports and vibrant night life. This picturesque port town offers some of the most pristine beaches on Crete, fine restaurants and boutique shops.

3. Luxurious Yet Affordable Accommodation

Villa in Crete Greece

Cretan villa

Summer holidays in Crete allow you to take full advantage of their hugely popular luxury family villas for great value. In every family villa, you can find all of the modern and essential amenities for your family. Experience the indulgent private pools and delicious barbecues whilst the kids have fun in the children’s pool and the playground. One of the top advantages that these family villas offer is impressive safety as all villas need to be certified to meet the required regulations.

The charming city of Chania offers a wide range of fantastic holiday villas. From seaside houses that offer a beautiful view of the natural splendours, to private oases near the beach resort of Maleme.  Whatever your holiday accommodation requirements are, Chania has a huge selection of affordable villas to choose from.

4. Exquisite Local Cuisine

Food on Crete

Cretan Food

Local Cretan cuisine is incomparable with its wide variety of dishes available. The flavourful blend of its unique ingredients with simple Cretan techniques produces a distinguishable taste that leaves you wanting more. For the cheese lovers, Crete has its own signature cheeses which are usually produced from sheep or goat’s milk. Graviera cheese offers a hard, yet sweet taste with nutty flavouring.

5. Friendly Locals 

Market in Crete Greece

Market in Crete

Crete has a very laid-back and relaxed atmosphere and this is reflects by the locals. Cretans are very friendly and extremely welcoming to tourists. They are genuine people who love to talk to visitors, so if you have any questions or need advice, don’t be afraid to ask them.

If you would like to visit Crete this summer, then book a summer holiday to Crete with the Midcounties Co-operative Travel.

This post is brought to you by Midcounties Co-operative Travel.

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5 reasons to visit Crete Greece

February 10, 2017

5 romantic experiences with a difference in Scandinavia

5 romantic experiences with a difference in Scandinavia
Snowmobile on frozen lake in Finland Scandinavia

Snowmobile in Finland

You may not automatically think of Scandinavia when you the consider things to do around Valentine’s Day. A proposal on the top of the Eiffel Tower in Paris, a romantic dinner in Rome, a luxurious hotel in the Lake District or maybe a gentle stroll along a beach in Spain? However, there are many lovely experiences to be had in the Nordic countries of Europe, especially in winter; here are 5 of my favourites

Scandinavia – Norway

Take ‘the world’s most beautiful voyage’ to the Arctic Circle

Hurtigruten ferry in Honningsvåg harbour Norway Scandinavia

Hurtigruten ferry in Honningsvåg harbour

The famous Hurtigruten Ferry may not be the most luxurious of cruise ships but what she lacks in grandeur she more than makes up for in romantic adventurousness. Still running as a postal service, ferries sail daily from Bergen via deep Norwegian fjords up to Tromsø and Kirkenes in the Arctic Circle. You pass some of the world’s most stunning scenery and in winter the snow-clad landscapes are truly breathtaking. Stops include Havoysund and Honningsvag from where you can get off to visit the North Cape. It’s an unforgettable voyage.

Melt the ice in a Snow Hotel

Moomintroll and Snork Maiden in Kirkenes Snow Hotel - Norway

Moomintroll and Snork Maiden in Kirkenes Snow Hotel

On the outskirts of Kirkenes, 250 miles into the Arctic Circle, you will find a very special place to stay. Snuggle up together in the Kirkenes Snow Hotel and you’ll feel on top of the world – literally. Every year tons of ice are used to create a unique hotel which positively encourages togetherness. When I was there, two couples were on their honeymoon and there’d been an engagement party the night before. Each ‘bedroom’ has a different theme with beautifully lit ice-sculptures throughout. The temperature is a regular -4 degrees Celsius and there are lots of activities including husky and reindeer rides. Scandinavia accommodation doesn’t get ‘cooler’ than this …

Sweden

Get away from it all with Greta Garbo

 Ystad Saltsjöbad Hot Tubs Sweden Scandinavia

Ystad Saltsjöbad Hot Tubs

To be precise, stay in the hotel where Greta Garbo, the reclusive Swedish actress, went to get away from it all in her homeland. The Ystad Saltjöbsad Hotel in the Skåne region of south Sweden has everything you want from a luxury break in Scandinavia. Gorgeous beach setting, gourmet dining, classic Swedish design and the indulgent spa are all highly conducive to romance. Enjoy a bottle of champagne in a double bath or relax together in one of the outdoor hot tubs – perfect any time of year.

Have fika – anytime, anywhere

Fika in Malmo Sweden

Fika in Malmo

Share a big piece of chocolate cake or light-as-a-feather lemon sponge in a cosy cafe with the one you adore. The Swedes love their coffee and cake; you can get great bakes all over Scandinavia but in Sweden they make a big deal of Fika. It’s basically ‘coffee and cake with friends’ (or lovers!) and in most workplaces throughout the country they stop for fika everyday. I had the most divine brownies in a greenhouse at Malmo Castle – simple pleasures in Sweden.

Finland

Cuddle up on a husky ride through the frozen north

Husky sleigh in Finland

Husky sleigh in Finland

Wrapped up in reindeer furs, dashing through the snow on the husky sleigh in the north of Finland – magic. Valentine’s Day is the perfect time to visit Finland as it’s covered in snow and there are lots of wonderful outdoor experiences for you to try. You could try reindeer racing or maybe a snowmobile safari across a frozen lake. In the evening sample local delicacies like Finnish meatballs, moose casserole, sauteed reindeer or Rönttönen, a pastry filled with lingonberries.

Iceland

Get hot and steamy with an old geysir

Geysir Hot Springs at Haukadalur

Hot Springs at Haukadalur

For a romantic break with a real difference, visit Iceland. This is definitely the quirkiest of the Nordic countries and can be very romantic. Stroll round the little streets of historic Reyjavik with its wooden houses, quaint museums and trendy bars. Take a tour of the Golden Circle to see the steamy geysirs and thundering Gulfoss Waterfall or go for a dip in the thermal waters of the Blue Lagoon.

And finally …

Kallbadhus Malmo 03 photo Oskar Falck c Malmö Turism Sweden Scandinavia

Kallbadhus Malmo – photo Oskar Falck c Malmö Turism

There are plenty more romantic things to do and places to see in Scandinavia. You might see the Northern Lights at any time in winter, or maybe discover Norse heritage in Greenland – more info here www.best-served.co.uk/destinations/greenland – or get even more off the beaten track in the Faroe Islands. Without doubt, Scandinavia has something for all lovers of romantic travel.

This article is in collaboration with Best Served Scandinavia, specialists in tailor-made holidays.

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Romantic Scandinavia Experiences by Zoe Dawes

January 28, 2017

Dunster by Candlelight on a winter’s eve in Exmoor

Dunster by Candlelight on a winter’s eve in Exmoor

Dunster by Candlelight - medieval village in Somerset on the edge of Exmoor

The giant stag, carried aloft on strong shoulders, glows an unearthly white. Cowled figures carrying candles walk silently past. Lords and ladies dressed in rich flowing garb stride proudly past. Children carrying lanterns are shepherded down along the road. A musician plays a tin whistle as the procession wends its way past hundreds of people lining the streets of the medieval Dunster. Every shop is brightly lit and there’s a carnival atmosphere, mixed with a sense of awe.  It’s the 30th anniversary of Dunster by Candlelight, a weekend of festivities and general merry-making that attracts visitors from around the UK and overseas.

Dunster at night Exmoor - photo zoedawes

Dunster at night

Dunster is in Somerset on the edge of Exmoor National Park in south west England. The village developed over the centuries around Dunster Castle which dates back to the 11th c. Mentioned in the Domesday Book, the castle was in the Luttrell family for hundreds of years; it’s now owned by the National Trust. The wool and cloth trade brought wealth to the area and the octagonal 17th c Yarn Market still stands in the heart of the village. Nowadays, Dunster is famous for being one of the best-preserved medieval villages in England. I’d never been before, so to see it during the Dunster by Candlelight festival was a real treat.

Dunster by Candlelight town and Castle Exmoor

Dunster by Candlelight

Buses shuttle visitors from nearby towns; I got on at seaside resort Minehead overlooking the Bristol Channel. I follow the procession from its starting point at Dunster Steep near the car park.  Villagers dress up as nobility and peasants, carrying racks of candles in jars or playing instruments. Two stilt walkers tower over us, one dressed as the devil with very realistic horns. We wend our way along the High Street past the Yarn Market towards the castle, lording it over us on a hill above the village. Turning off along Church Street we pass St George’s Church, where a choir sings Christmas carols. In a walled garden a man wielding a chain-saw is carving an eagle out of a tree trunk.

Dunster Wood Cutter

Along West Street we are entertained by a band of energetic drummers and candlelit Fire Spinners twirling and swirling. Collecting boxes are shaken and filled by generous onlookers. ‘The heart of Candlelight focuses on raising funds for St Margaret’s Hospice, which provides so much comfort for those who so need it’, writes Chairman Andy Fay in the excellent Dunster by Candlelight programme leaflet. Father Christmas waves as we walk by.

Dunster Father Christmas

The procession ends at the 17th c Water Mill, where the miller is milling by candlelight. The mill still produces flour and has a popular Tea Room. The stag is gently removed from its plinth and the racks of candles are laid down. There’s a general air of merriment and relief. The following eve, Saturday, the villagers will be doing it all again, but for now they can relax and enjoy the rest of the evening’s events.

Dunster Castle

I make my way up to Dunster Castle, focal point for the village, brightly lit and enticing with the smell of BBQ sausages and burgers. The Stables have been converted into a Christmas Market, selling local food and drink and handmade gifts. People jostle each other to get a better look at the tasty treats on sale. I’m tempted by tiny Christmas Cakes, some very moreish-looking frosted baeks and jars of home-made preserves. I finally choose chocolate dogs and a bottle of Spiced Somerset Chaider.

Dunster Castle Christmas Market products

Inside the castle the Quantock Musical Theatre Choir is entertaining an appreciative audience in the Drawing Room. In each of the ground floor rooms an enormous Christmas Tree, beautifully decorated, adds a festive note to its historic contents. It feels as if the Luttrell family have invited us in to help them celebrate a very special Victorian Christmas.

Dunster Castle Christmas Exmoor

Back in the town I head off to the old Tithe Barn, where a man with a python round his neck is scaring and enthralling the audience in equal measure. Beside the path I find Ian Mabbutt and Seb Jay with a large telescope pointed up into the winter sky. Ian runs West Withy Farm Holiday Cottages, where I am staying whilst in Exmoor. Seb, a noted astronomer, runs Dark Sky Telescope Hire. “Exmoor is a great place for stargazing; it’s Europe’s first International Dark Sky Reserve. Once you get out of the populated areas, the stars take your breath away.”  Later that evening, back at West Withy Farm, Seb gives a master class in the skies above us.

Dunster Christmas Bauble

Dunster Christmas Shop lures me in with its charming display. Among the Santas, bells, elves and snowmen I see a pretty bauble with a hand-painted scene of Dunster; perfect souvenir of my visit. (More on the Dunster Christmas Bauble here.) In the street outside a man with a marked resemblance to Harpo Marx is playing a piano whilst another man juggles fire and plays a harmonica on top of it. The audience are laughing delightedly at their antics; it sums up the joyful spirit you find at Dunster by Candlelight. One day I will return to see Dunster by Daylight …

Dunster by Candlelight street artists - Exmoor - photo zoe dawes

Many thanks to Visit Exmoor for hosting my weekend, and to Ian and Lorena of West Withy Farm for their warm welcome, hospitality and invaluable advice on what to see in this beautiful area in south west England.

Read more: A winter weekend in Exmoor

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Dunster by Candlelight Exmoor - Pinterest

January 18, 2017

7 top holiday places – with a difference

7 top holiday places – with a difference

7 top holiday places around the world

Dreaming of getting away from the grey skies of Britain for some sunshine? Fancy a classic road trip adventure? A wildlife experience second to none? A city break closer to home? If you’re planning your next holiday, here are 7 top places to inspire you to travel differently this year.

1.  Gorillas in Rwanda, West Africa

Gorilla family in Rwanda West Africa - photo zoedawes

Gorilla family

There are many reasons to visit Rwanda, including its stunning scenery and friendly people but undoubtedly the main attraction is the mountain gorillas. To be close to a huge silverback and his young son munching on bamboo right in front of you is to totally unforgettable. You have to book well in advance, get a permit and be prepared for a hike up a fairly steep (extinct) volcano, but it is well worth the time, effort and yes, expense, for a genuine ‘once in a lifetime’ holiday experience.

Read my memorable encounter with gorillas in Rwanda.

2.  Idyllic beaches (and flamingos if you’re lucky) in the Caribbean

Eagle Beach Aruba

Eagle Beach

Tyuly turquoise sea, really white sand, virtually guaranteed sunshine, enormous cocktails, a dash of history and a little light entertainment. Perfect ingredients for a relaxing sunshine holiday. Aruba has everything the hedonist could wish for, plus a sense of fun that livens things up every day. When you get bored with lying on a gorgeous beach, you could learn to paddle-board, go on a 4×4 safari or take a wander through their desert-like National Park. It’s very popular for weddings and couples. There are plenty of top-class hotels to choose from and some great package deals to be had all year round. (If you want to see the pretty flamingos you’ll have to stay at the Renaissance Aruba Resort and Casino so you can visit their private island.) Check out my Top Fun Things to Do in Aruba.

3. Explore the ancient city of Lancaster

Lancaster Castle tour

Lancaster Castle

Take a break in one of the UK’s known cities, Lancaster, in the north west of England. Lancaster Castle is one of the most interesting castles in Britain because, until recently, it was used as prison and still functions as Lancashire’s Crown Court. With a 1000 years of history it is the most popular sight in the city, but the rest of the city is worth taking time to get to know. Visit the Judges Lodgings to see where legal eagles used to reside, wander along the Lancaster Canal and have a drink at the Water Witch or walk up to the Ashton Memorial for superb views across to Morecambe Bay. Nearby Leighton Hall is home of the Gillow family, famous furniture makers. Find out about the Light Up Lancaster Festival here.

4. A road trip through the Rocky Mountains, Canada

RV by Medicine Lake Jasper Canada - image zoe dawes

RV by Medicine Lake

If you’d asked me a couple of years ago what I’d think of driving a motorhome anywhere, never mind through the biggest mountain range in Canada, I’d have probably laughed and said, ‘No Way’. But when I was invited to go from Vancouver to Calgary in an RV (Recreational Vehicle) last year, I was persuaded that I could, and I’m so glad I did. It was the best fun ever, and now I’m a total convert! The roads are easy, the scenery stupendous and you’ll probably get to see some amazing  wildlife along the way. It really is an unforgettable holiday. Find out more in my 10 most memorable moments on a Canada road trip.

5. Take a selfie at the most popular landmark on Instagram

Paris - infographic cewe photoworld

Paris – cewe photoworld

And now for something completely different. Do you know what the most popular #hashtag landmark on Instagram is? The clue in the photo. With its famous steel girders standing proud over the city of Paris, the Eiffel Tower has been instagrammed over 3 million times. Take a lift to the top and join the ultimate selfie crowd on the ultimate French icon. In this infographic by cewe photoworld you can find the Top 10 Most Instagrammed Places in the World.

6. Discover the Causeway Coast of Ireland

Portstewart Northern Ireland at sunset

Portstewart at sunset

If you’re a fan of Game of Thrones, you’ll already be familiar with the Causeway Coast in Northern Ireland as it features in many episodes, especially in the first few series. However, there is so much more here than the spooky Dark Hedges (aka The King’s Road). It’s a culinary treasure trove of fresh and imaginatively cooked food and home to renowned Bushmills Whiskey. You mustn’t miss the Giant’s Causeway, a UNESCO World Heritage site or the beautiful beaches along the coastal road. Still need persuading? Here’s my Top 10 places on the Causeway Coast – go on, go on, go on – you’ll love it.

7. Take time out in Western Australia

Tip holiday ideas - Perth Harbour - Western Australia - photo zoe dawes

Perth Harbour

Planning on visiting relatives in Australia? Consider lengthening your holiday with a stay in or around the lovely city of Perth. Capital of Western Australia, Perth has a relaxed cultural scene, beautiful harbour and lively cafe society. Nearby Fremantle is now a focus for hipsters, foodies, artists and history buffs. Popular holiday destination Rottnest Island with its quirky quokkas is a short ferry-ride away. Love wine? Further south you’ll find some of the world’s top quality wineries in the very attractive Margaret River region.

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Top Holiday Places with a difference

This article is brought to you in collaboration with cewe photobooks. They make a wide range of photobooks , calendars, cards and prints so why not upload your travel photos and create a lasting souvenir. Find out more about the CEWE Photobooks here.

November 11, 2016

See Lancaster in a brilliant new light

See Lancaster in a brilliant new light
When the Red Rose - in Lancaster by Steve Messam - photo zoedawes

When the Red Rose – in Lancaster

“I really like being a part of the #LightupLancaster Festival because of its accessible scale, its friendly atmosphere and the way Lancaster lends itself to a variety of settings for the events and installations. The whole city comes out to enjoy it.” Renowned artist Steve Messam was explaining what he enjoyed about exhibiting his unique artwork, ‘When the Red Rose – in Lancaster’. We were standing beneath a collection of bright red balloons of various sizes, some of which had lights bobbing around inside them. Rain gently pattered onto the brilliant globes, “It’s a lovely sound, isn’t it? Working with balloons is about colour and size. It’s visual and about the sound too. They make people happy.”

when-the-red-rose-lancaster-steve-messam

Steve Messam

For the past three years, Light Up Lancaster Festival, part of the Light up the North Consortium, has been brightening up the city over the November 5th Bonfire Night weekend. Local and international artists put on lively street performances and virtually every corner of the city has some quirky artwork or show to illuminate the evening. This year’s was bigger and, of course, better than ever.

Light up Lancaster 2016 programme

Light up Lancaster 2016 programme

A couple of weeks’ earlier, I’d been to the LightPool Festival in Blackpool, where Steve had created a very different version of When the Red Rose, this time encasing one of the Victorian shelters on the promenade in one huge balloon. I live just 10 minutes away from Lancaster but had never been to Light up Lancaster so I was really excited to see what it was all about. It was fascinating to watch Steve and his team putting up the balloons in the ‘Secret Garden’ at the back of the Storey Institute. They inflated them indoors then brought them outside and attached them to a large metal frame. It took a long time to get it all in place but by the time the festival officially started as dusk fell, When the Red Rose – in Lancaster’ was ready for its audience.

Assembling 'When the Red Rose' Lancaster - collage zoedawes

Assembling ‘When the Red Rose’

Meeting up with a couple of friends, we then spent about four hours wandering round the city, finding laughter, light and colour everywhere we went. My favourite was Lock and Key at Lancaster Castle. It was a magical Son et Lumiere show projected onto the imposing crenelated walls of what used to be one of HM’s prisons, with pumped up music and audience participation. The castle is Lancaster’s biggest visitor attraction and the ideal place for such a dynamic show.

Lock and Key - Light up Lancaster Castle - photo zoedawes

Lock and Key at Lancaster Castle

Other highlights included the Illumaphonium, an interactive musical instrument like a giant upright xylophone in front of the Priory and Light Boat in Market Square, a giant wooden structure under a light canopy, promoted as the slowest boat on earth. At Electric Fireworks in the Storey Institute, we shone coloured torches onto a screen and created our own firework display. Cosmic Paranoia was a rather unnerving film of big eyes drifting across the cosmos. One of the most popular interactive installations was LightWeight, where people had their photos taken which were then projected onto a giant revolving globe behind the Museum. Local dancers put on a lively performance called Light Rain in Sun Square; very appropriate as we had intermittent light showers all evening.

Light up Lancaster 2016 - collage zoedawes

Light up Lancaster 2016

French artists Scenocosme lit up the Judges Lodgings where people joined together to bring the building alive, though something may have been lost in translation as it seemed to be unlit for quite a time! We were entertained by  the Vox Boys Choir in the Priory; an impressive setting for Children’s Voices. The final event of the Friday night was also the most affecting. Recommisioned, by the Dukes Theatre at Lancaster Museum, explored the journey of young soldiers from Lancaster King’s Own Regiment in WWI through light, sound, text and movement. On entering we were each given an envelope representing one of the soldiers, some who lived and many who died. After the very moving performance we opened our envelopes; my young man was a corporal from Millom who’d died in battle.

recommissioned-light-up-lancaster

Recommissioned

The following night I returned for the Lancaster Firework Display but had time to visit If Boats Could Talk, a charming sculpture floating beside the Lancaster Canal towpath, illustrating the story of migration to the city by a Victorian paver and a Syrian refugee. In Aldcliffe Triangle I met artist Shane Johnstone, who explained its creation and how the children of Dallas Road Primary School designed much of this artwork, as well as the brightly lit lanterns.

If Boats Could Talk - Aldcliffe Triangle Lancaster

If Boats Could Talk – Aldcliffe Triangle

For the grand finale I joined hundreds of spectators on Quay Meadow, where we were entertained by BBC Radio Lancashire and a very talented musician called Joni Fuller. Bang on 8pm, a rocket soared over Lancaster Castle, music boomed out from the radio tent and we were treated to 20 minutes of spectacular fireworks, a fitting end to a splendid weekend.

Fireworks over Lancaster Castle - photo c/o Light up Lancaster

Fireworks over Lancaster Castle – photo c/o Light up Lancaster

I went along as a guest of Visit Lancashire and Light up Lancaster. It’s really encouraging to see the capital city of Lancashire putting such a vibrant cultural display of light and magic. I’ll definitely be going along next year; hope to see you there!

October 30, 2016

Brilliant #LightPool illuminates Blackpool in artistic style

Brilliant #LightPool illuminates Blackpool in artistic style
When the Red Rose by Steve Messam Lightpool Blackpool - photo zoedawes

‘When the Red Rose’ by Steve Messam

The large red balloon glows like a radioactive tomato, enticing visitors with its voluptuous beauty. Children run up to it and gaze in amazement. Photographers try to capture its scarlet vibrancy, cyclists glance at it as they whiz past – and an unobtrusive guard ensures no-one damages its fragile form. Artist Steve Messsam created ‘When the Red Rose’ one of a series of beautiful artworks he’s making for Lancashire. It’s all the more impressive as it’s only here until November 2nd 2016.

When the Red Rose Steve Messam - Lightpool - Blackpool - photo zoedawes

‘When the Red Rose’ in daytime

I’m in Blackpool for the launch of LightPool, a festival of light and joyfulness running from October 29th to November 2nd. Barry McCann, Visitor Ambassador, explains what #Lightpool is all about. Lightpool is a wonderful celebration that ties in with Blackpool Illuminations. It was decided to expand what we offer at this time of year to include art installations along the promenade, live performances and also a special exhibition of Neon at the Grundy Art Gallery. We’ve also got brilliant 3D videos projected onto Blackpool Tower including Chasing Stars: our adventures in Space from British astronaut Tim Peake and a very quirky one called, ‘Down the Rabbit Hole‘, loosely based on ‘Alice in Wonderland’. Yoko Ono has a couple of installations including ‘Imagine’ at the head of the North Pier.

Imagine by Yoko Ono - Lightpool Blackpool - photo zoedawes

Imagine – by Yoko Ono

“At Lightpool Village, you get a drink and watch the live performances that go on every evening on the Comedy Carpet in front of the Tower. You can even have your photo taken and projected onto the Tower!  The festival is FREE, as of course are the illuminations and it’s bringing loads more visitors who are spending more time here. We’ve got so much to offer, and it’s great to have a bigger cultural offering for the town, but still linked to our seaside heritage.” Barry offers to show me round; our first stop is Neon; The Charged Line at the Grundy Art Gallery.

Neon Exhibition - Grundy Art Gallery - Lightpool Blackpool

Neon Exhibition – Grundy Art Gallery

Bringing together one of the biggest collection of Neon artworks ever seen, it’s a feast for the eyes. There’s a ballerina wearing a tutu of neon tubes, a trio of art-deco style moving panels, a bright red triangular installation that gives a dramatic 3D effect and much more. Upstairs in the Rotunda Gallery are ‘images of original designs for 1930s neon Illuminations, taken from Blackpool’s unique and historic archive of working drawings,’ including some by Georges Claude, inventor of Neon. Education Officer Taneesha Ahmed says the exhibitions appeal to all ages, especially younger children.  One of the big draws is  ‘I Know, I Know, I Know’ created by Tracey Emin in 2002, but every exhibit is a delight.

tracey-emin-i-know-neon-exhibition-lightpool

‘I Know, I Know, I Know’ by Tracey Emin

We leave the Grundy and walked down towards the Promenade. It starts to drizzle but nothing serious. I’ve not been to Blackpool for a couple of years and the town is looking a lot smarter than it used to. It’s mid-afternoon on a half-term Friday and there a loads of people, mainly on the prom but also in the shops, bars, restaurants and cafes. As we near the North Pier I can see ‘When the Red Rose’, its redness brightening up the grey day. Steve Messam has taken one of the Victorian shelters that line the Golden Mile and enveloped it in a red ‘balloon’ of material. No idea how he has done it but the effect is delightful.

When the Red Rose by North Pier Lightpool Blackpool - photo zoedawes

When the Red Rose by North Pier

We walk along the shore to Blackpool Tower, that icon of British seaside exuberance, visible from all over North West England. We go upstairs to the Tower Ballroom where we watch couples of all ages dancing and enjoying afternoon tea, and I dream of appearing on Strictly Come Dancing

Afternoon Tea Dance at The Tower Ballroom Blackpool - photo zoedawes

The Tower Ballroom

From the window we get a great view of the beach and people starting to mill about for the start of the main #LightPool events this evening. I’m getting peckish so we queue for ages at Harry Ramsden’s, but it’s worth it as the fish and chips really are very good. It’s going dark and soon the Illuminations will be turned on and #LightPool will come alive. Barry takes me over to SnapCast, where Manager Tom Westcott explains how visitors can get their photo taken, as if turning on the Blackpool Illuminations and other poses. If they buy a photo souvenir they can then get their photo projected onto the Tower. Barry and I have our picture taken – what do you think?!

Lightpool Snapcast - Blackpool Tower

Lightpool Snapcast – Blackpool Tower

The Illuminations come on and Blackpool is doing what it does best; giving its visitors the best light show in the country. The Tower suddenly bursts into a rainbow of light announcing LIGHTPOOL in glowing neon. A band starts to play lively music. People jig about in time to the music. A brightly-lit heritage tram trundles past, looking like a gaudy old American steam-train and LightPool Village does a roaring trade in light sabres and fluorescent wands. Barry’s colleague Annette clears a space through the audience to make way for the first performance: Captain Kronos: Return to Planet Earth. There’s a carnival atmosphere that is enhanced by the dramatically innovative attractions that Lightpool brings to Blackpool.

LightPool Blackpool - collage by zoedawes

LightPool

All too soon I have to leave to get a train back to Carnforth. As we walk back along the Promenade, we pass a memorial for Remembrance Day. The face of a young sailor gazes out at us from a huge poppy. In the distance, When the Red Rose, glows in the dark beside the sea. Only in Blackpool, only at LightPool …

We Will Never Forget - Blackpool Remembrance Day Memorial

We Will Never Forget

More about the LightPool Festival, on until Wednesday, November 2nd. Blackpool Illuminations are on until November 6th 2016. Thanks so much to Visit Lancashire for inviting me to experience this unique festival and to Barry McCann for showing me round and sharing his knowledge and love for his home town.

Another Steve Messam incarnation of ‘When the Red Rose’ was at #LightUpLancaster Festival over the weekend of Nov 4th and 5th in Lancaster.

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#LightPool Festival of Light Blackpool - image zoedawes

September 27, 2016

A delightful walking holiday on the Yorkshire coast

A delightful walking holiday on the Yorkshire coast
Surfer walking along Whitby Cliffs, North Yorkshire - zoedawes

Surfer on Whitby Cliffs

Striding along the cliff top, the surfer added a somewhat incongruous element to this view of Whitby by the North Sea on the Yorkshire coast. I was here on a walking holiday with HF Holidays, and enjoying the great weather before going to Larpool Hall, where I was staying for 3 nights.

Whitby Abbey Yorkshire - walking holiday - photo zoedawes

Whitby Abbey

Walking Holiday: Day 1 – Whitby

Famous as inspiration for Bram Stoker’s Dracula, dramatic Whitby Abbey dates back to the 13th c. I spent an hour wandering about and taking photos, watching children having a go at archery and listening to the excellent audio-guide. Then I headed off to Robin Hood’s Bay, one of the North Yorkshire Coast’s most popular tourist spots.

Robin Hoods Bay Yorkshire - zoedawes

The tiny harbour marks the end of the Coast to Coast Walk, which starts near where I live, on the Cumbria coast, at St Bees. It was lovely to see so many people enjoying the summer sun, sitting outside the pub, dabbling in the rock pools, paddling in the sea and sunbathing on the beach. A perfect summer’s day.

HF Holidays - Larpool Hall - Whitby Photo zoedawes

HF Holidays – Larpool Hall

I arrived at Georgian Larpool Hall in the late afternoon and was welcomed by friendly Assistant Manager Sally who showed me around. My en-suite single bedroom overlooked the courtyard and had everything you’d want for a few days’ stay.

Larpool Hall - Whitby - HF Holidays

Larpool Hall

I had missed afternoon tea but was in time to meet fellow guests and go for the introductory walk with Christine Brook,  our guide for the next few days. HF Holidays runs with a large team of volunteer guides who play a huge part in the success of the company. Christine gave us a bit of history of the Larpool Hall, then we went along the railway trail which goes past the back of the house.

Hf Holidays walking group on Whitby Viaduct - photo zoedawes

Christine and walking group on Whitby Viaduct

We stopped at the local secondary school which has a replica of a Celtic Cross to commemorate Anglo Saxon poet Caedmon, who looked after the animals at Whitby Abbey in the 7thc AD. On our walk back we saw the abbey silhouetted  in the evening sun and caught a glimpse of a North Yorkshire Moors Railway steam train puffing into the town centre.

Whitby Harbour, abbey and steam train - yorkshire - photo zoedawes

Whitby Harbour

Back at Larpool Hall, there was just time to get changed before Christine gave us a briefing about the next day’s walk, along the coast. I was a bit unsure of the protocol for dinner but a helpful waiter explained it was free seating so I joined one of the circular dining tables. The food is excellent – I can see why guests love it here. I’ve been on a number of group holidays and sometimes the food lets it down. Not at Larpool Hall.

Meals at Larpool Hall HF Holidays Yorkshire - photo zoedawes

Meals at Larpool Hall

Table-talk was convivial and everyone was very friendly. I was there on my own but not for one minute did I feel lonely. After dinner about 40 of us took part in a lively General Knowledge Quiz, ably chaired by Christine. Every evening there was an organised activity but they’re not compulsory; I spent one evening chatting with fellow guests at the bar. There was a stunning sunset; sadly the maxim; ‘Red sky at night, shepherd’s delight‘ was not so accurate.

Sunset at Larpool Hall Whitby - photo zoedawes

Sunset at Larpool Hall

Walking Holiday: Day 2 – North Yorkshire Coast

The Cleveland Way - Runswick Bay to Staithes - Yorkshire - photo zoedawes

The Cleveland Way – Runswick Bay to Staithes

The next morning was overcast but dry. After an excellent cooked breakfast, I collected my packed lunch. The day before, I’d ordered a sandwich from a list of fillings and bread; it was waiting in the dining room, along with a tempting selection of ‘ingredients’ which include fresh fruit, raw vegetables, cheese and crackers, dried fruit, hard-boiled eggs, cake, biscuits and loads more.

Packed lunch selection at HF Holidays Larpool Hall Whitby - image zoedawes

HF Holidays Lunch

Our mini-bus took us to Runswick Bay, the starting point for our coastal walk to Staithes. Originally a fishing village, now it’s a very popular tourist destination. The quaint fishing cottages are mostly holiday homes and it has one of Britain’s few independent Life Boat Stations. It was misty so the views across the Bay were limited but it wasn’t raining and we were all in very good spirits.

Runswick Bay Yorkshire - photo zoedawes

Runswick Bay

We set off along the Cleveland Way, following a well-marked path that took us along what would be a spectacular coastline, had the sea fret not rolled in and obscured our view. Access to the little bay of Port Mulgrave is currently closed due to erosion of the cliffs. Christine explained the old harbour was used to transport iron ore, which was mined locally and taken to Jarrow for processing. Through the mist we could just make out some old buildings and the remains of the pier.

Port Mulgrave on Cleveland Way - Yorkshire - photo zoedawes

Port Mulgrave

We arrived in Staithes in time for lunch, which we ate on the attractive harbour front. Formerly a mining/fishing village, Staithes is on the way up, as can been seen in the rebuilding and new shops opening up everywhere. BBC TV children’s series Old Jack’s Boat, starring Bernard Cribbins, is filmed here and there are plenty of souvenir and craft shops, plus an Art Gallery. Staithes was home to the Staithes Group, a 19thc art colony.

Old Jack's Boat Staithes

Old Jack’s Boat banner

The quirky little Captain Cook and Staithes Heritage Centre has a comprehensive collection of  Cook memorabilia, collected by the owner in charming higglede-piggeldy displays. There’s also a unique exhibition of photographs and objects telling the story of Staithes. It’s one of the best small museums I’ve ever seen.

Captain Cook and Staithes Heritage Centre

Captain Cook and Staithes Heritage Centre

It started to rain as we got into the mini bus to take us back to Whitby. Some went back to Larpool Hall and a few of us joined Christine for an afternoon walk round the town. Even in the pouring rain, Whitby has an evocative charm all its own. We saw Captain Cook’s statue, the Whalebone Arch, the hotel where Bram Stoker wrote ‘Dracula‘, the jet shops along the little lanes and the 199 steps up to Whitby Abbey.

Whitby in the rain - HF Holidays - Yorkshire - photo zoedawes

Our group in Whitby rain

Our walk back took us through Pannett Park, where we stopped off at the Art Gallery and Whitby Museum. We got back to Larpool Hall in the late afternoon, nicely worn-out after our day’s walking and ready for another delicious dinner.

Walking Holiday: Day 3 – Castle Howard

Castle Howard and Atlas Fountain - Yorkshire - zoedawes

Castle Howard and Atlas Fountain

The sun shone throughout our final day of the walking holiday. Our coach driver dropped us off on the edge of the Castle Howard estate and we took a leisurely stroll past the Temple of the Four Winds, the Mausoleum and the Pyramid – and a very fine herd of Angus cattle.

Yorkshire HF Walking Holiday - Castle Howard - photo zoedawes

Our day was spent exploring the grounds and interior of Castle Howard, built between 1699 and 1702. The top of the famous dome is being re-gilded but the beauty of the house is still apparent, especially when viewed from the splendid Atlas Fountain. I ate my packed lunch in the delicately scented Rose Garden.

The Rose Garden - Castle Howard Yorkshire- photo zoedawes

The Rose Garden

Every room in Castle Howard is a treasure trove of beautiful paintings, impressive sculptures and exquisite furniture, much dating from its heyday in the Georgian era. The interior view of the dome (restored after a serious fire) is breathtaking and there is an interesting display of photographs from the filming of Brideshead Revisited. The Howard family Chapel has lovely Pre-Raphaelite stained glass windows designed by Edward Burne-Jones.

Inside Castle Howard - collage zoedawes

Inside Castle Howard

On our way back to Larpool Hall we crossed the North Yorkshire Moors which were flooded with purple heather. That evening dinner was very lively as we shared our favourite parts of the walking holiday. Christine organised a little quiz for those staying in and took me down to the town centre for the last night of the Whitby Folk Festival. Listening to sea shanties and blues music sung in a traditional pub seemed a very fitting end to a very memorable few days on the Yorkshire Coast.

Singer in pub Whitby Folk Festival

Singer in Whitby pub

Many thanks to HF Holidays for inviting me. You can find out more about their Walking with Sightseeing Holidays here. Thanks also to Christine for cheerful guidance on the walking holiday and to Sally and the team at Larpool Pool for being so helpful and friendly. Finally, a special mention to the friends I made during the trip and to my feisty fellow walkers. It was a real pleasure to spend time exploring the Yorkshire coast and surrounding area together.

In front of Temple of the Winds, Castle Howard - HF Holidays - zoedawes

Our walking group in front of Temple of the Winds, Castle Howard

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