Tag Archives: city
January 9, 2017

Top food and drink in Fremantle, Western Australia

Top food and drink in Fremantle, Western Australia
Sail and Anchor beers Fremantle

Sail and Anchor beers

For a small city, Fremantle, on the coast of Western Australia, punches well above its weight in terms of great places to eat, drink and have fun. Not only does it have a great many excellent bars, restaurants and cafes, there are a number of micro-breweries, bakeries, delicatessens and quirky foodie outlets to suit all tastes. Many of them are housed in heritage buildings, for Fremantle is one of Australia’s oldest cities with a busy working port and a vibrant, creative heart.

Attic Cafe – Bannister Street

Attic Cafe Fremantle Western Australia

Attic Cafe

One of the best cafes in town, the Attic Cafe, opposite the Hougoumont Hotel in Bannister Street is a great place for breakfast, coffee or take-away. They have a tasty selection of freshly made pies, fritters wraps, salads and rolls, including honey roast pumpkin and salt beef. For breakfast you could choose baked oats with berry compote, smashed avocado with lime, feta and quinoa or more exotic Shakshouka; eggs poached in a Tunisian style sauce with white cheese. I had perfectly cooked scrambled eggs with olive oil, greens and sourdough bread. Their cakes are to die for …

Attic Cafe food Fremantle Western Australia

Attic Cafe food

A night out in Fremantle

Pakenham Street Fremantle at night

Pakenham Street

I stayed in Fremantle for two nights and loved its attractive architecture, lively vibe and youthful outlook. Rusty Creighton, Two Feet and a Heartbeat Tours, font of local knowledge, not just on food and drink, but just about every aspect of Fremantle culture, history and people, took a group of us on a historical night tour. We started off at our hotel, the Hougoumont, named after a 19th c ship which was the last vessel to transport convicts to Australia. Their names and crimes are listed on the hotel wall.

Hougoumont Hotel Fremantle

Hougoumont Hotel

After crisp-baked pizza and a drink we set off along the main street, lined with beautiful buildings dating back to the 19th century, very old by Australian standards.

The National Hotel – High Street

The Boxing Kangaroo - Swan Lager - National Hotel - Fremantle - photo zoe dawes

The Boxing Kangaroo

Rusty pointed out a mural of a kangaroo wearing boxing gloves, holding a can of Swan Lager. “The Swan Brewery has closed but the Boxing Kangaroo became the symbol of America’s Cup win in 1983, as it was used on a team flag. The original flag is now in the Western Australia Museum in Freo.” It’s on the side of the National Hotel, another famous Fremantle institution. It’s been a hotel since 1886 and has intricate wrought iron balconies.

The National Hotel in Fremantle

The National Hotel

There’s a lively bar and popular restaurant, serving decent pub grub, including good value steak and chips. We’d eaten there the night before, in the upstairs dining room. Downstairs there was a group playing covers of popular songs with impromptu dancing round the tables. A door decorated with orange and red stained glass flames commemorates a serious fire in 1975.

Bread in Common – Pakenham Street

Bread in Common Fremantle

Bread in Common display

The smell of freshly baked bread wafted all around as we entered the bakery. But this was not just any bakery, this was Bread in Common, a bakery with restaurant, bar, delicatessen counter and vegetable garden attached. Actually the vegetable garden is a couple of raised beds in the street in front of the 1898 Listed Building, growing a very healthy display of lettuces, herbs and other fresh produce. From Hansel and Gretel, the two massive wood-fired ovens, come a wide variety of breads, made using the freshest ingredients including different flours, sourdough, fruits and spices.

Bread in Common Bakery and Restaurant Fremantle

Bread in Common

We watched as the bustling open kitchen prepared meals and admired the excellent wines displayed above the bar. House specialties include roasted pork belly with fermented kohlrabi, pear, radish and mustard, and salmon with baby peppers, kale and pineapple vinegar.

Fremantle Markets – South Terrace & Henderson Street

Fremantle Market

Fremantle Market

Within a purpose-built market hall, erected in 1897, are a collection of markets, including fresh fruit and veg, clothes, cooked food and household goods. You can buy enormous Indian samosas, admire beautifully carved melons, papayas and apples, buy a big, knobbly custard apple or try a guaranteed hangover cure. A ‘Stunned Emu‘ advertises quirky magnets and other souvenirs. I can highly recommend Small Batch flavoured chocolate bars.

Fremantle Market goods

Downtown Fremantle

From the market we headed off down-town, along South Terrace towards the sea. We passed cosy wine bars, noisy pubs, cool cafes and cosmopolitan restaurants serving food from around the globe. People were queuing good-naturedly to get inside Metropolis nightclub and nearby Salt and Anchor was heaving with beer-lovers quaffing over 20 Aussie and international craft beers on tap and many more bottled beers. On the pavement a street artist played jazz and Latin tunes on his electric organ and a couple we’re doing a salsa. We crossed the Esplanade and passed the skate park; my son would be very impressed with its contemporary design. At Fishing Boat Harbour is one of Fremantle’s most famous eateries, Little Creatures.

Little Creatures Brewery – Fishing Boat Harbour

Little Creatures Brewery bicycle Fremantle Western Australia

Little Creatures Bar

Entering the brewery, housed in a converted boathouse, the noise and delicious smell of food hit us full on. We made our way past the enormous metal cyclinders of brewing beers and rows of trestle tables and found a table at the back of the restaurant area. Upstairs more tables line a narrow corridor which has an eclectic collection of local modern art. It’s a fascinating place, attracting a mix of all ages who come for the excellent beer (their Pale Ale and seasonal beers are most popular), wood-fired pizzas, sharing platters and hearty mains such as slow-cooked brisket.

Little Creatures Brewery Fremantle Western Australia

We ordered a whole load of plates including pumpkin and mushroom pizzas, kangaroo and tomato chutney, marinated octopus, veggie nachos, sticky lamb ribs and sea-salty fresh oysters. It was a real feast of colourful, well-cooked food, great flavours and generous portions. We drank vast quantities of their beer and excellent wines whilst Rusty regaled us with fascinating stories ending the evening feeling very merry and full of Freo joie de vivre …

Cheers from Little Creatures in Fremantle Western Australia

Cheers from ‘Little Creatures’ in Fremantle

That morning we’d got the ferry from Fremantle to Rottnest Island and spent the day there. Read about my search for the quirky quokka of Rottnest Island here.

Rottnest Island Bus - Western Australia

Rottnest Island Bus

I travelled to Perth, Fremantle, Rottnest Island and Margaret River courtesy of Tourism Western Australia #justanotherdayinWA. I’d like to thank everyone, including my fellow bloggers, involved in making this such a memorable trip.

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Fremantle Food & Drink

 

December 2, 2016

Historic sights: 48 hours in Rome, Italy

Historic sights: 48 hours in Rome, Italy
The Trevi Fountain - 48 hours in Rome - photo zoedawes

The Trevi Fountain

“It’s like travelling through history… The people are great, they’re very friendly, which makes a difference.” Dany, concierge for Citalia Holidays in Rome, was introducing me to his favourite city, sharing some top tips and insider secrets to help make my 48 hours in Rome a big success.

‘Live’ video of Dany, Citalia Concierge, talking about Rome

I’d never visited Rome before; it had been on my Dream Destination list for decades. Arriving mid-afternoon, I was picked up from the airport and whisked to The Ariston, a chic hotel very close to the railway station in the city centre. Here is my itinerary and suggestions for a truly memorable time in the Eternal City. NB: I didn’t go inside all of the sights so take that  into account in planning.

 48 Hours in Rome

Take a bit of time to get your bearings. If you have a concierge, do use them or whoever is local, to get an idea of what is possible in a short stay. You’ll want to see the main sights, but be realistic. They are simply awe-inspiring and you may want to spend quite a time at each one. There are usually BIG QUEUES so it’s worth doing research and booking tours or tickets in advance. Public transport in Rome is not brilliant; the Metro only has two lines which barely touch the major sites. Trams and buses go all over the city but traffic often slows it down.

Day 1 – late afternoon and evening

Santa Maria Maggiore Basilica - 48 hours in Rome - by zoedawes

Santa Maria Maggiore Basilica

One of Rome’s greatest basilicas, Santa Maria Maggiore, is not far from the station and my hotel, so I walked up to see it. Its nave and splendid mosaics date back to the 5th Century AD. It towers over the busy piazza, and its ceiling is a stupendous gold avenue that showers light into its cavernous interior. There are some beautiful paintings and sculptures and beneath the alter is a crypt with a statue of a Pope and a crystal reliquary said to contain wood from the Holy Crib. St Jerome and the superb Italian sculptor Gian Lorenzo Bernini are buried here.

Italian Dinner and Rome by Night

A tour of Rome by night gives you a chance to see the city’s magnificent monuments lit up, giving a whole other perspective. I went on Gray Line’s ‘Panoramic Rome Bus Tour by Night with Traditional Dinner‘, with hotel pick-up and guide, Sandra, whose in-depth knowledge and enthusiasm for her city added to the enjoyment of the evening. A small group of us started out with a 3-course meal at Fontana di Venere, a pleasant restaurant in the city centre.

Dinner at Ristorante Fontana di Venere Trastevere Rome

Dinner at Ristorante Fontana di Venere

We were joined by a larger group and went to see the Trevi Fountain, recently revealed in all its refurbished glory. The marble glowed brilliant white and the turquoise water glittered as a steady stream of coins cascaded into its curved basin. Completed in 1762, Taming of the Waters is the theme of the gigantic Trevi Fountain and the statue of Oceanus dominates the scene.

Throwing coins in the Trevi Fountain - 48 hours in Rome - zoedawes

Three coins in the Fountain

Sandra said, “Stand with your back to the fountain. Throw a coin from your right hand over your left shoulder and you’ll return to Rome for sure.” I threw three coins in the fountain, just like in the song, as I had already fallen deeply in love with this city and definitely want to return.

The Colosseum at night - 48 hours in Rome

The Colosseum at night

Then it was on the coach to the Colosseum. It really is breath-taking in size, architecture and historic significance. We drove round it as Sandra gave us its story then walked up to it via the Arch of Constantine. It was wonderful to finally see it. We drove on round many sights and then across the Tiber to Trastevere, where we wandered the narrow streets and enjoyed the friendly, lively atmosphere amongst restaurants, bars, shops and charming buildings.

Trastevere at night - 48 hours in Rome

Trastevere at night

I got back to the Hotel Ariston at 11pm, tired but very happy, having already got a flavour of this magical city.

Day 2 – Morning: Roman Rome

The Colosseum and Horse Sculpture - Rome

The Colosseum and Horse Sculpture

Getting the Metro to the Colosseum means coming out directly opposite – a real WOW moment. Even if you’ve seen it in the evening, it’s still impressive. Pay extra to get a ‘jump the queue’ ticket to avoid the queues or, if time’s limited, walk around it just get a feel for its magnificence. The ticket includes Palatine Hill, where Romulus founded the city and Emperors built their palaces and the Forum, ancient Rome’s centre of temples, basilicas and public spaces. This could take you all morning or afternoon, to really enjoy at your leisure. I got a great view of the Forum from behind the Capitoline Hill, along with a very photogenic seagull!

The Forum - and seagull! Rome in 48 hours

The Forum – and seagull!

From here you can walk through the lovely Piazza del Campidoglio, designed by Michelangelo in 1538, with an impressive statue of Marcus Aurelius overlooking the city below, between two huge statues of Castor and Pollux. the Capitoline Museums house one of Italy’s finest collections of classical sculptures. Again, if you want to visit the museum, make sure you leave plenty of time to enjoy it.

Capitoline Hill from Cordonata Staircase - 48 hours in Rome - zoedawes

Capitoline Hill from Cordonata Staircase

Just round the corner, in Piazza Venezia is Il Vittoriano, or Altare dela Patria. This mish-mash of ornate styles in honour of Victor Emmanuel, first king of united Italy, is home to the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and has one of the best views of Rome from the top.

Il Vittoriano - 48 hours in Rome

Il Vittoriano

By now you’re probably hungry and need to refuel for your 48 hours in Rome so head towards Historical Centre and the Pantheon where you’ll find plenty of restaurants and bars. Or do what I did, which was to grab a pizza slice and make my way over the Tiber to Vatican City.

Day 2 – Afternoon: Vatican City

The Vatican City - 48 hours in Rome

Vatican City

Book a tour for the Vatican Museum. It reduces queuing time and there’s so much to see your guide will help you through the fascinating maze of world-class artworks here. Ancient Greek sculptures, Roman statues, priceless votives, intricate tapestries, beautiful mosaics, early maps, religious icons, gilded ceilings, paintings by renowned artists …

Vatican Museum Treasures - 48 hours in Rome

Vatican Museum Treasures

Every room and corridor was crammed with people gazing in awe at the every surface, being gently chivvied along by guides and we only scratched the surface of the Vatican Museum. Finally we came to the Sistine Chapel. It is simply breath-taking. Every inch of the walls and ceiling is covered with colourful frescoes by Michelangelo and his acolytes. We had twenty minutes to take it all in – and, in spite of the crowds, I’d have happily spent all afternoon there.

The Sistine Chapel ceiling - image wikipedia

The Sistine Chapel ceiling

The final part of the tour was to St Peter’s Basilica and, because Pope Francis had declared a Jubilee, we were allowed in through the Holy Door, along with thousands of pilgrims from around the world. At the end of the nave Bernini’s ornate Baldacchino towers above the High Altar. Michelangelo’s Pietà draws the crowds, but every inch of this enormous church demands attention.

Michelangelo's Pieta in St Peter's Basilica - Rome - photo zoedawes

Michelangelo’s Pieta in St Peter’s Basilica

As we left Vatican City I looked back at it lit up and knew I’d have to return another time to spend more time uncovering its cultural treasures.

In the evening you’re spoilt for choice where to eat. I returned to Trastevere, in a quieter corner and had an excellent meal at Le Mani in Pasta. (More on this in a future article on Food and Drink in Rome.)

Spaghetti Carbonara at Le Mani in Pasta - Trastavere Rome

Spaghetti Carbonara at Le Mani in Pasta

Day 3 – morning: Spanish Steps, Piazza del Popolo and the Pantheon

You’re probably a little tired by this stage in your 48 hours in Rome but there’s still so much to see. There’s the Pantheon, Piazza Novona, Aventine Hill, Castel Del Angelo, more museums, art galleries, shops, restaurants … I got the Metro to the Spanish Steps, which were relatively quiet early on a Sunday Morning. Children played and drank from the quirky boat-shaped fountain, a chestnut seller kept warm over his brazier and horses snorted as they waited for tourists to show round town.

The Spanish Steps - 48 hours in Rome

The Spanish Steps

It’s like Montmartre in Paris at the top of the steps; artists paint popular scenes and cartoonists encourage you to look ridiculous. I wandered off along the path towards the Villa Borghese. There are wonderful views across the city here. I didn’t have time to visit the Villa but went down into Piazza del Popolo just as midday bells rang out across the square from at least three churches …


I walked along Via del Corso past huge churches, fashionable shops and people enjoying the late autumn sun. My final stop on was the Pantheon. Formerly a Roman temple c 126AD, it’s now a church on the site of an earlier temple commissioned by Marcus Agrippa during the reign of Augustus. Sadly I couldn’t go inside as it was time to leave. However, I am most definitely coming back; 48 hours in Rome just isn’t enough to see it all!

The Pantheon - 48 hours in Rome - zoedawes

The Pantheon

Many thanks to Citalia, leading specialist in Italian holidays, who organised this 48 hours in Rome weekend. Winners of the title of ‘Best Tour Operator to the Italian Peninsula’ for seven years in a row.  The Citalia team are friendly, expert and knowledgeable in all things Italian and have local concierges in each destination for personal recommendations, advice and help with day trips, car hire, or restaurant bookings. For more information visit the Citalia Rome page.

This trip was a Travelator Media world-wide campaign. Find out more about Travelator Media here.

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48 hours in Rome with The Quirky Traveller

November 11, 2016

See Lancaster in a brilliant new light

See Lancaster in a brilliant new light
When the Red Rose - in Lancaster by Steve Messam - photo zoedawes

When the Red Rose – in Lancaster

“I really like being a part of the #LightupLancaster Festival because of its accessible scale, its friendly atmosphere and the way Lancaster lends itself to a variety of settings for the events and installations. The whole city comes out to enjoy it.” Renowned artist Steve Messam was explaining what he enjoyed about exhibiting his unique artwork, ‘When the Red Rose – in Lancaster’. We were standing beneath a collection of bright red balloons of various sizes, some of which had lights bobbing around inside them. Rain gently pattered onto the brilliant globes, “It’s a lovely sound, isn’t it? Working with balloons is about colour and size. It’s visual and about the sound too. They make people happy.”

when-the-red-rose-lancaster-steve-messam

Steve Messam

For the past three years, Light Up Lancaster Festival, part of the Light up the North Consortium, has been brightening up the city over the November 5th Bonfire Night weekend. Local and international artists put on lively street performances and virtually every corner of the city has some quirky artwork or show to illuminate the evening. This year’s was bigger and, of course, better than ever.

Light up Lancaster 2016 programme

Light up Lancaster 2016 programme

A couple of weeks’ earlier, I’d been to the LightPool Festival in Blackpool, where Steve had created a very different version of When the Red Rose, this time encasing one of the Victorian shelters on the promenade in one huge balloon. I live just 10 minutes away from Lancaster but had never been to Light up Lancaster so I was really excited to see what it was all about. It was fascinating to watch Steve and his team putting up the balloons in the ‘Secret Garden’ at the back of the Storey Institute. They inflated them indoors then brought them outside and attached them to a large metal frame. It took a long time to get it all in place but by the time the festival officially started as dusk fell, When the Red Rose – in Lancaster’ was ready for its audience.

Assembling 'When the Red Rose' Lancaster - collage zoedawes

Assembling ‘When the Red Rose’

Meeting up with a couple of friends, we then spent about four hours wandering round the city, finding laughter, light and colour everywhere we went. My favourite was Lock and Key at Lancaster Castle. It was a magical Son et Lumiere show projected onto the imposing crenelated walls of what used to be one of HM’s prisons, with pumped up music and audience participation. The castle is Lancaster’s biggest visitor attraction and the ideal place for such a dynamic show.

Lock and Key - Light up Lancaster Castle - photo zoedawes

Lock and Key at Lancaster Castle

Other highlights included the Illumaphonium, an interactive musical instrument like a giant upright xylophone in front of the Priory and Light Boat in Market Square, a giant wooden structure under a light canopy, promoted as the slowest boat on earth. At Electric Fireworks in the Storey Institute, we shone coloured torches onto a screen and created our own firework display. Cosmic Paranoia was a rather unnerving film of big eyes drifting across the cosmos. One of the most popular interactive installations was LightWeight, where people had their photos taken which were then projected onto a giant revolving globe behind the Museum. Local dancers put on a lively performance called Light Rain in Sun Square; very appropriate as we had intermittent light showers all evening.

Light up Lancaster 2016 - collage zoedawes

Light up Lancaster 2016

French artists Scenocosme lit up the Judges Lodgings where people joined together to bring the building alive, though something may have been lost in translation as it seemed to be unlit for quite a time! We were entertained by  the Vox Boys Choir in the Priory; an impressive setting for Children’s Voices. The final event of the Friday night was also the most affecting. Recommisioned, by the Dukes Theatre at Lancaster Museum, explored the journey of young soldiers from Lancaster King’s Own Regiment in WWI through light, sound, text and movement. On entering we were each given an envelope representing one of the soldiers, some who lived and many who died. After the very moving performance we opened our envelopes; my young man was a corporal from Millom who’d died in battle.

recommissioned-light-up-lancaster

Recommissioned

The following night I returned for the Lancaster Firework Display but had time to visit If Boats Could Talk, a charming sculpture floating beside the Lancaster Canal towpath, illustrating the story of migration to the city by a Victorian paver and a Syrian refugee. In Aldcliffe Triangle I met artist Shane Johnstone, who explained its creation and how the children of Dallas Road Primary School designed much of this artwork, as well as the brightly lit lanterns.

If Boats Could Talk - Aldcliffe Triangle Lancaster

If Boats Could Talk – Aldcliffe Triangle

For the grand finale I joined hundreds of spectators on Quay Meadow, where we were entertained by BBC Radio Lancashire and a very talented musician called Joni Fuller. Bang on 8pm, a rocket soared over Lancaster Castle, music boomed out from the radio tent and we were treated to 20 minutes of spectacular fireworks, a fitting end to a splendid weekend.

Fireworks over Lancaster Castle - photo c/o Light up Lancaster

Fireworks over Lancaster Castle – photo c/o Light up Lancaster

I went along as a guest of Visit Lancashire and Light up Lancaster. It’s really encouraging to see the capital city of Lancashire putting such a vibrant cultural display of light and magic. I’ll definitely be going along next year; hope to see you there!

October 14, 2016

An Arabic cookery lesson at Beit Sitti in Jordan

An Arabic cookery lesson at Beit Sitti in Jordan
Beit Sitti - Amman Jordan - image zoedawes

Beit Sitti

“Food is the soul of the family. Food is our way of showinghospitality but it is much more than that. Our grandmother lived in this house and she loved cooking for us. We wanted to preserve her legacy and show how traditional Arabic food is made.” I was in the kitchen area of Beit Sitti (Grandmother’s House), surrounded by beautiful objects on tables and walls, including many family photographs, in the heart of Amman, capital of Jordan.

Beit Sitti Amman Jordan - collage zoedawes

Beit Sitti interior

Maria Haddad and her sisters set up Beit Sitti in the family home to teach visitors how to cook and to offer a uniquely personal dining experience. Maria was explaining the history of the house, situated in one of Amman’s oldest neighbourhoods – Jabal al weibdeh – and the importance of Arabic cookery in Middle Eastern culture.

Arabic Cookery ingredients - Beit Sitti

Arabic Cookery ingredients – Beit Sitti

12 of us had gathered at Beit Sitti to learn how to make some simple Arabic dishes. The ingredients were laid out in front of us. Huge aubergines (eggplant), plump tomatoes, zingy lemons, tiny cucumbers, glossy onions, chubby garlic and bunches of herbs, scented the room with a taste-bud-tingling fragrance. “We’ll be making Fattet Makdous, a fried eggplant dish with toasted pitta bread, yoghurt and cucumber dip  followed by Muhallabieh with Osmelieh (orange blossom milk pudding with vermicelli) plus some other side dishes.”  Maria gave each one of us tasks and very soon the kitchen was a hive of busy cooker bees.

Arabic Cookery at Beit Sitti

Beit Sitti - preparing an Arabic meal - zoedawes

Preparing the meal

I was put in charge of chopping the cucumber for the dip. Others were preparing the fattet makdous and osmalieh, making up a tomato salad and frying pitta bread. All the while, Maria told stories of her family and the development of this unique dining experience in Jordan. She and her sisters were keen to ensure it was a personal and informal. “We collected traditional recipes from our grandmother and others and wanted to share the love we feel for our food, teach some basic Arabic Cookery but also to give participants the chance to eat the food they cooked in homely surroundings.”

Making osmalieh - Arabic cookery - Beit Sitti Jordan

Making osmalieh

Once I’d finished chopping cucumbers I had to saute onions and tomatoes then add the aubergine mix to the pan, stirring for 10 minutes til cooked. Stefan took the pitta, which had been lovingly made into little circles, to the garden to get it cooked in the outdoor oven. From the raised garden there was a good view out across the city.

Beit Sitti outdoor oven - Amman Jordan - image zoedawes

Beit Sitti outdoor oven

Another ‘cook’ made a paste from garlic and added yoghurt and mint to the cucumber, then scattered mint on top, creating a beautiful bowl of cooling dip to accompany the meal.

Yoghurt and cucumber dip - Beit Sitti - collage zoedawes

Yoghurt and cucumber dip

Whilst a large table was being laid with attractive plates and cutlery, the meal started to come together. Having assembled the cooked aubergine mix and fried pitta bread in layers in a large glass dish, Maria took a large pot of yoghurt and poured it on top of the mix in a thick layer. Then she swirled gloriously sticky pomegranate molasses across the top and it was ready to serve.

Arabic cookery Yoghurt and Fattet Makdous Beit Sitti

Maria adds yoghurt to Fattet Makdous

We sat down at the table and the dishes were spread out in front of us. Bottles of coke, Sprite and iced water were poured. Before we could start, there was a flurry of camera shutters as we all tried to capture this vegetarian banquet. Then we passed round the dishes and silence reigned as we enjoyed the culinary fruits of our labours …

Arabic cookery - Beit Sitti vegetarian meal - Amman Jordan - image zoedawes

Beit Sitti lunch

After our meal I bought a jar of pomegranate molasses and a few other products key to Arabic cookery; when I got home I was going to try some of the recipes and I wanted the original flavours. Needless to say, no photo could capture the pleasure we got from its exotic flavours and scented delight. However, this little video may give you an idea of what we experienced.

I travelled to Jordan courtesy of Visit Jordan. Many thanks to our guide Berhan for his unfailing courtesy and indefatigable knowledge and to everyone I met in this beautiful, welcoming country. Read about fulfilling a lifelong ambition to see Petra here, one of the world’s most famous historic sites.

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Arabic Cookery - Beit Sitti Amman Jordan

May 18, 2016

Quirky Travel Photo: the ‘Great Men’ of Milan at Casa degli Omenoni

Quirky Travel Photo: the ‘Great Men’ of Milan at Casa degli Omenoni
The House of the Titans - Milan Italy zoedawes

The ‘Great Men’ of Casa degli Omenoni

Tucked away in a little backstreet near Il Duomo, Milan’s famous Cathedral, is Clubino, an exclusive gentlemen’s club. Historically it is better known,  appropriately, as the Casa degli Omenoni – the House of the Great Men (rebuilt 1565-67). Adorning its facade are eight enormous male figures with serious features. They were made by sculptor Antonio Abondio, to a design by renowned Italian sculptor Leone Leoni (c1509 – 1590) to decorate his own mansion. They are Atlantes (Titans), named after Atlas, decorative supporting figures, their heads bowed to take the weight of the structure above.

Casa degli omenoni milan italy zoedawes

Casa degli Omenoni facade with ‘Atlantes’

I was shown this impressive building during a walking tour of Milan with Milanese travel blogger Simon Falvo; you can read her fascinating blog Wild about Travel.  It’s great to go round with a local as you get to see sights that a tourist often misses. I only spent 24 hours in the city and barely scratched the surface of its many historical and architectural treasures, but these figures made a big impression. In his poem ‘The House of the Titans’ George William Russell refers to “… the tender shadow of long-vanquished pain and brightening wisdom …” which sculptor Abondoni has captured beautifully in these evocative figures.

Casa degli Omenoni Atlantes Milan Italy zoedawes

Casa degli Omenoni

If you visit Milan, search out the Casa degli Omenoni; you’ll find it at No 3 Via degli Omenoni; well worth a detour from nearby Piazza Il Duomo .

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The Great Men of Milan Italy Casa degli Omenoni - image zoedawes

April 15, 2016

A Grand Day Out in Nottingham

A Grand Day Out in Nottingham
Council-House-Nottingham

Nottingham Council House – photo Smashman

The East Midlands city of Nottingham attracts visitors from all over, and it is not difficult to see why. There really is something for everybody, right from the tourist who never gets tired of visiting museums, the architecture student who loves finding out about the history behind the old buildings, or the sports enthusiast who enjoys the outdoors in the good summer months.

Nottingham houses a population of just short of 730,000 people, making it the second largest city in the Midlands. It’s quite an old one too, although historians haven’t been able to pinpoint exactly how old: the first mention of it comes from 868 AD, however, under the name of Snotengaham. As a settlement, experts date it back to the 7th century. But what’s there to do in Nottingham today?

THE OUTLAW

Robin_Hood_Memorial Nottingham

The Robin Hood Memorial – source en.wikipedia.org

One of the city’s greatest tourist attractions, of course, is the Robin Hood Town Tour that takes us back to medieval days when Nottingham’s infamous legend roamed the immediate area and Sherwood Forest. Be charmed as you follow the history of Robin Hood history and the legendary tales of how he and his band of merry men stole from the rich to give to the poor (whether true or false). Whether you’re a grownup or child, be enthralled as you go on a historical trip with Robin that takes you to a world of sword fights and heroic deeds. This tour is a worthwhile experience for those who love to travel and want to hear a bit about any great city’s folklore.

Not everybody wants to limit themselves to a specific time schedule as would be the case when you join the above tour; therefore those who like to be a bit more flexible plan their own movements and cover some of the Robin Hood Town Tour activities on their own.

WOLLATON HALL AND DEER PARK

Wollaton Hall - Nottingham

Wollaton Hall – source flickr.com

 An Elizabethan mansion in the middle of the city, Wollaton Hall, a beautiful old architectural masterpiece, has a rich history like so many buildings from that era. Today the mansion opens its doors to the public on a regular basis and offers various themes to keep the crowds coming back. There are the “Once upon a Time in Wollaton,” “Marie Curie’s Walk to Remember” and “Summer Nights Outdoor Film Festivals,” to name some of the activities which prove to be popular.

A NIGHT OF EXCITEMENT

Try something different. No city, and that includes Nottingham, offers only historical tours and visits to old buildings; other attractions seem to pull the crowds in too. If playing poker is an activity you enjoy, then be sure to check out live tournaments at casinos such as those that bring players from all over to the tables, also to Nottingham. Dusk till Dawn Casino Nottingham plays host annually to the well-known UKIPT poker tour. Pro player Ben Jenkins has actually said on record that he prefers the Nottingham tournament to those in Vegas! So get ready for some fun times at the poker tables.

CITY OF CAVES

City Of Caves Nottingham

City Of Caves – source youtube.com

Nottingham’s City of Caves is an attraction for those who appreciate a modern-day complex of cellars, storerooms and the like that were used as dwellings for humans as far back as, at least, the 11th century. Today, family and school outings make it possible to learn more about Nottingham’s ancient history. Guided tours make a visit a fascinating experience.

THE NOTTINGHAM PLAYHOUSE

If your idea of entertainment includes an evening of world-class theatre, then book your tickets to one of the numerous shows that delight patrons. The Nottingham Playhouse offers a wonderful selection: if you like drama, music or dance, you will find it here. Also, interesting evenings during which discussions related to theatrical events and issues take place. You want a good chuckle? Comedy is also on the menu, and the themes vary greatly so everyone has something to look forward to; from light-hearted material to make you laugh, to serious and thought-provoking issues that will linger for some time afterwards. To complete a great experience, visit Cast, the restaurant and bar at the Playhouse. Find time to visit this theatre complex; you will not be disappointed.

THE LACE MARKET

Nottingham Lace Market justice_galleries

Nottingham Lace Market – source goss.nottinghamcity.gov.uk

Take a leisurely stroll through the fashionable Lace Market district and get a feel of the shops, restaurants and bars. Nottingham was the center of the world’s lace industry during the time of the British Empire, and although this neighborhood was never really a lace market as such, lace did play an important role here as the area’s buildings served as a locale where lace was stored and sold. Today the area’s mostly Victorian and Georgian buildings have been beautifully restored and are now home to academic institutions, apartments and offices. More than 100 of these were designed by architect Watson Fothergill in the Gothic revival and Old English vernacular styles and erected between 1870 and 1906. The brick buildings of Broadway and the magnificent Adams Building on Stoney Street stand out as great architectural beacons of the area.

NATIONAL ICE CENTRE

Situated on Bolero Square, the National Ice Centre provides fun for one and all, whether to visit simply to watch the experienced skaters, or try your own moves. Various activities are offered for beginners: there are family skating outings, lessons for tots and even an ice hockey clinic. The Ice Centre’s Ice Stars also had their own show on CBBC. These are youngsters who are members of the Centre. Visit the Centre; it is a wonderful outing for families and singles alike.

OUTDOOR INSPIRATION

Nottingham_Castle_Gate_2009

Nottingham Castle Gate – source en.wikipedia.org

When the weather is good, take the kids on a fun walk of the city, past some well-known attractions such as Nottingham Castle, through dark tunnels and right onto the Lace Square for a bite at one of the many restaurants. Various other walks for sightseeing, or just being out, make Nottingham a great visit when the weather plays along.

Whether you travel by car, coach, train or air, Nottingham is very easy to reach, not far from London, Scotland or Ireland. It’s an exciting city that caters for all and not to be missed when you decide to venture into the Midlands. It’s also a great weekend getaway.

December 15, 2015

Get into the festive spirit at Liverpool Christmas Market

Get into the festive spirit at Liverpool Christmas Market

Phoenix Christmas snowman

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas … With only a few days to go, there are festive decorations in every city, town and village throughout the country. Christmas cards keep landing on the mat; last night I spent a few happy hours writing cards to old friends and sticking stamps on envelopes. (Yes, I know e-cards are more environmentally friendly but I like the personal touch of a ‘real’ card, though I do send some e-cards to friends far away or if they send them to me.) A recent visit to Liverpool Christmas Market got us properly into the festive spirit.

Festive knitted figures - image zoedawes

John and I had gone to see our son, who started at Liverpool John Moores University in September. He seemed to be throwing himself into student life with serious dedication, managing to fit in lectures around hangovers and the gym, We had lunch at Almost Famous American-style burger joint, which serves great burgers, hot dogs, chicken wings and other cholesterol-raising delights in quirky surroundings.

Almost Famous buger bar mural Liverpool - photo zoedawes

Almost Famous mural

It’s over-priced IMO, charging extra for fries, serve what look like fairly insipid cocktails and they make a feature of cheap cutlery and kitchen roll. It was packed and Alex loved it, which is all that mattered.

Liverpool One Christmas - image John Bradley

Liverpool One Christmas – image John Bradley

Then it was shopping time. I’d visions of us wandering round Liverpool One, the flagship Shopping Mall, gazing in envy at the designer clothes and trying on potential Christmas Day frocks. But that was not to be; we spent most of the time in and out of charity shops and ‘Vintage’ outlets where Alex rifled through racks of clothes looking for bargain brand-names. He’s become very consumerist in a studenty kind of way!

Liverpool Christmas Market - image itsliverpool.com

Liverpool Christmas Market – image itsliverpool.com

Liverpool Christmas Market

Eventually John and I left him and had a look round Liverpool Christmas Market. It’s mainly along  Lord Street, Church Street, Paradise Street with some stalls centred around Williamson Square. There were the usual stalls selling Christmas decorations including quaint knitted figures, crystal baubles and every imaginable wooden item on which personal messages or names could be inscribed.

Christmas decorations - zoedawes

Christmas decorations

It was a very blustery, wet afternoon (precursor to devastating Storm Desmond as it turned out) and there weren’t too many people braving the weather. Those that were, made the most of the gluhwein, bratworst, gingerbread and other tasty treats on sale. Must admit, I am not a big fan of German sausage but they seemed very popular.

Bratwurst stall Liverpool Christmas Market - zoedawes

Bratwurst stall Liverpool

One of the more unusual things this Christmas is the Liverpool Snowflake Trail, where, according to Visit Liverpool, Jack Frost is transforming Liverpool city centre into a wintry wonderland of festive fun for young and old. Explore the city along his Snowflake Trail, and see Liverpool transformed by sparkling winterscapes, with familiar streets becoming swirling snowstorms of sound and light. And don’t forget to keep an eye out for the giant painted snowflakes scattered around and about! 

Liverpool Snowflake Trail

Snowflake Trail

There’s a map of the Trail and you can’t miss these colourful snowflakes, especially the enormous one in Williamson Square.

Liverpool SnowflakeTrail Map

Liverpool SnowflakeTrail Map

 

Festive Beer Hut Liverpool

Liverpool Beer Hut

 

Another quirky sight is the large cone decorated with pink and purple hearts. It’s actually a Beer Hut; inside there is a bar and all around are cosy little nooks which seat about six people. Not sure about the colour scheme but it’s definitely eye-catching! Not far away, there’s also an open-air Ice Rink which attracts wannabe Torvill and Deans through til January.

Of course, it wouldn’t be Liverpool without music and there were street performers on every corner. One guy, who looked remarkably like John Lennon, was playing a guitar and singing Beatles hits, but the one getting the most attention was a guy who turned himself into a ‘Human Transformer’ and danced around to hiphop. From almost every shop came the sound of Christmas songs and the whole atmosphere was festive and fun, in spite of the weather.

Liverpool Christmas Market - Rudolph's Rest - photo zoedawes

Rudolph’s Rest

I bought a couple of festive novelties, John debated having some Mulled Wine but gave it a miss as we had to meet Alex and get home. (If you’re going to make it yourself, then I can highly recommend Blue Moose Kitchen Mulled Wine Sachets. Add one to some decent wine – it knocks spots off the bottled versions!)

Mulled wine stall Liverpool Christmas Market - zoedawes

Mulled wine stall

It was lovely to spend some time wandering round Liverpool Christmas Market; hope you get to visit one over the festive season. If you like Christmas Markets then you’ll also enjoy The festive sparkle of Manchester Christmas Market 🙂

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