Sep 30

Upper Canada Village: escape to another era where life is slower and more relaxed

by in Blog trip, History, North America

Horses Upper Canada Village Ontario - photo Zoe Dawes

Carriage horses on Church Street

The children squeal with delight as a piglet clambers over the back of its brother to get a better place in the sun.  A huge sow slowly rolls over in the gloopy mud, grunts and flops back into contented slumber. A tussle breaks out as three youngsters nip ears and legs before deciding it’s all too much effort and collapse in a piggy heap on top of each other. Just another day of buccolic pleasure in Upper Canada Village, not far from Morrisberg in Ontario.

Pigs in sunshine - Upper Canada Village Ontario - collage Zoe Dawes

Happy pigs

Less than 60 miles (90kms) from Ottawa, Upper Canada Village is a unique visitor attraction depicting life in Ontario around 1866, when the pace of life was much slower. Many of the 40 historical buildings were transported here from nearby villages which were flooded to make way for the St Lawrence Seaway in the 1950s. It gives a vivid idea of 19th century agricultural practices including caring for livestock, growing crops and harvesting vegetables. Attractive gardens showcase the plants and flowers that would have been grown in the summer. Staff dressed in clothing of the period carry out domestic tasks and discuss what social life, music, religion and politics would have been like at the time. They demonstrate how cheese, bread, shoes, tin jugs, brooms, furniture, dresses and hats were made.

Crafts at Upper Canada Village Ontario - collage Zoe Dawes

Demonstrating crafts and housework

I’m visiting Upper Canada Village with local travel blogger Cindy Baker of Travel Bliss Now on a day out from Ottawa. It’s a school trip day and lots of children run around the grounds, stopping to pat horses and watch sheep being shorn. Wandering along sunny paths and through shady nooks we pass the Woollen Factory and Saw Mill before reaching elegant yellow house. On the veranda a young woman in a vivid orange dress sits reading a book.

Robertson House Upper Canada Village - photo Zoe Dawes

Robertson House

Inside Robertson Home we learn how a well-to-do middle-class family would have lived. The parlour has ornate decor with family portraits and lots of knick-knackery typical of the Victorian era. Further on we find the Bakery where a young man is showing how the bread is made. Later in the day we see the baker’s horse-drawn cart collect the bread; it’s sold on site and served in the Village Cafe and at Willards Hotel.

Bakery Bread Upper Canada Village - collage Zoe Dawes

From bread oven to table

We have lunch at Willards Hotel,  with Customer Service & Corporate Communications Manager Susan Le Clair. Willard’s Hotel is one of the oldest buildings on the site, constructed in the late 1790s and restored to the style of the 1850s. It’s now a restaurant where we are served by costumed waiting staff with food from the period. I have the local bread and cheese platter – very tasty. Susan explains the philosophy of Upper Canada Village. “Our aim is to show what it was really like to live and work in the 19th Century. Many people in Canada have little idea of what that looks like and this place is ideal to teach visitors some of our important history in an engaging and fun way. It’s especially popular with families and people come back year after year. We have a diverse and interesting Educational Program that enable young people to discover their past in engaging and fun way. Although we’re usually closed in the winter months, we do have special events including our very quirky Pumkinferno at Halloween.” 

Susan Le Clair in the livery Upper Canada Village - photo Zoe Dawes

Susan Le Clair in the Livery

After a delicious meal, Cindy and I go off to explore more of the village. In the distance we catch a glimpse of some people floating by on some sort of craft. It’s the horse-drawn tow scow which pootles back and forth along the village canal from the dock behind Cook’s Tavern to the Tenant Farm. A tow scow is ‘ … a flat hulled barge that is drawn along the canal by a horse walking along the bank. Two villagers (one at the bow, and one at the stern) help steer the scow using long poles. In typical village life, the scow would be used to transport heavy goods to mills and other distant locations.‘ (Upper Canada Village website.)

Horse-drawn Tow Scow in Upper Canada Village Ontario - photo Zoe Dawes

Horse-drawn Tow Scow

We climb aboard and listen to the gentle shuck of the boat on the water as we pass the Pier Light. A flock of Canada Geese pecking around in the grass, honking as we pass and overhead birds swoop and dive across the clear blue sky. Time seems to slow down and the ‘real world’ fades away as we drift along. Beyond the canal, the wide open waters of the Saint Lawrence River glitter and ripple as ship sails past; an incongruous reminder of 21st century Canada.

Tow Scow trip Upper Canada Village Ontario

Tow Scow on the canal beside St Lawrence River

 The tower of white-painted Christ Church peaks out above the trees near the canal. On the front cover an excellent book, ‘A Village Arising – the Story of the Building of Upper Canada 1957-1961 and After‘ by Peter Stokes, there’s a photo of the church being hauled along the road from Moulinette to the site of Upper Canada Village on top of flat-bed trucks. We peak inside; the interior is similar to a Scottish Presbyterian kirk and includes box pews, a gallery and a cast iron stove.
Christ Church - Upper Canada Village - photo Zoe Dawes

Christ Church

Just round the corner from the church is brick built Cook’s Tavern, which serves Ginger Beer and Sarsaparilla,  based on the popular 19th century tonic made from the root of a South American plant (Genus Smilax).  Commonly referred to as “root beer”, these tonics contained a variety of roots, such as ginger for tang, sassafras for flavour and sarsaparilla to make it foam. Outside, a few people are waiting for one of the horse-drawn wagons to take them on a 20 minute drive round the village. It’s late afternoon and the school groups have left; the place is quiet, with a tranquil atmosphere very different from the frenetic excitement of the morning.

Cook's Tavern Upper Canada Village

Cook’s Tavern

Exploring some of the back lanes of the village we come across a farm with a large-horned cattle in the fields and a tiny calf in a paddock. I get up close to take a photo and the farmer asks if I want to buy him. We haggle a bit and then I seem to have bought him for a couple of dollars. “Now you can take him back to the barn.” I think the farmer is joking but no; the next minute, a rope is thrust into my hand and I am taking a calf for a walk …

Walking calf on farm Upper Canada Village - Zoe Dawes

Walking my baby back home

After a full-on day it’s time to go. On our way out, we have a quick look at the gift shop and exhibition centre, which tells the history of the area. Outside the little train that runs round Upper Canada Village is setting off on its last ride. We stop for a photo of the monument commemorating the Battle of Crysler’s Farm, a nationally significant battle in the War of 1812 that halted the 1813 invasion of Canada.
Upper Canada Village

As we drive onto the main road back to Ottawa I can still hear the sound of children’s laughter, feel the soft muzzle of the wagon horse and smell that freshly baked bread. Upper Canada Village is a charming place of sensory and historic enjoyment that magically encapsulates an idyllic moment in Canadian history …

Days Out from Ottawa

This is just one of the many day trips you can take from Ottawa. I also visited Merrickville, a pretty village on the banks of the Rideau Canal, Diefenbunker, Canada’s Cold War Museum, Fultons Pancake House and Sugar Bush and spent a very relaxing day at Nordik Spa-Nature, a luxury spa at the entrance to Gatineau Park.

Many thanks to Susan Le Clair of Upper Canada Village for showing me round and sharing stories about this unique attraction. Grateful thanks also to Air Transat, Destination Canada and Ottawa Tourism for sponsoring my visit to Canada. It was a pleasure to explore more of Canada, a country of unforgettable experiences.

Check out Canada Keep Exploring to discover more about where to go and what to do in Ottawa. Return flights from Gatwick to Toronto from £346 (October 2017) and £349 (May 2018) per person with Air Transat. Canadian Affair offers an 8-day package tour Ontario Taster Holiday which includes 2 nights in Ottawa.

Find out more about Canada in these articles

Discover Ottawa, Canada’s charming capital city 

Ottawa: 8 fun ways to celebrate #Canada150 in the capital city

Top 10 Memorable Moments in Canada

Vancouver in 24 hours

A Digital Detox with the Grizzly Bears of British Columbia

Top tips for a motorhome trip across Canada

Upper Canada Village – LOVE IT? PIN IT!

Upper Canada Village Ontario - Pinterest - Zoe Dawes

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17 Responses to “Upper Canada Village: escape to another era where life is slower and more relaxed”

  1. From Zoe Dawes:

    This is one of the very best sites of its kind I’ve every been to. Unlike some places, the staff are not ‘actors’ but people doing real tasks that they clearly enjoy. The engage ‘in character’ but are also happy to talk as modern-day workers, very knowledgeable, answering questions as best they can and very friendly. We were very lucky with the weather so spent a lot of time outdoors, but nearly all the crafts etc are indoors so it is most definitely an all-weather day out.

    Posted on October 2, 2017 at 12:40 pm #
  2. From Kathryn @TravelWithKat:

    Sounds like fascinating day out. And looks like you had a great weather for it. That cow is so cute!

    Posted on October 2, 2017 at 4:39 pm #
  3. From Zoe Dawes:

    It was a grand day out Kat. Just glad I didn’t have to find space for that calf in my luggage 😉

    Posted on October 2, 2017 at 5:58 pm #
  4. From Lucy:

    What an interesting place! I went to a similar style living history site in Fort William Historical Park near Thunder Bay and it was fascinating to go back in time and see how people used to live.

    Posted on October 2, 2017 at 6:58 pm #
  5. From Zoe Dawes:

    It’s fascinating isn’t it to get such insights Lucy. I’ve not seen one on such a large scale in the UK.

    Posted on October 2, 2017 at 8:44 pm #
  6. From Cindy Baker:

    That was such a fabulous day in the sunshine and you’ve captured it perfectly! I agree – – what makes this place so special is that the people are actually growing the grain, making the bread, and crafting the shoes so they can give a good context of what it was like. And they all clearly loved being there. As did I!

    Posted on October 4, 2017 at 5:51 pm #
  7. From Zoe Dawes:

    It was a pleasure to share it with you Cindy 🙂 I really enjoyed learning more about your fascinating country and also staying in Ottawa – I can see why you love living there so much. I do hope to visit again another time.

    Posted on October 5, 2017 at 11:22 am #
  8. From Jason Evans:

    Now that does look like a fun day out. Like the idea of being towed along the canal by a horse!

    Posted on October 11, 2017 at 2:23 pm #
  9. From Zoe Dawes:

    Yes, it was all good fun, helped by lovely weather and the friendly people who work at Upper Canada Village 🙂

    Posted on October 11, 2017 at 2:28 pm #
  10. From Stuart Forster:

    Looks like you had another fantastic experience in Canada. I’m a big fan of root beer, so will have to pop into the Cook’s Tavern when I’m there.

    Posted on October 14, 2017 at 1:54 pm #
  11. From Zoe Dawes:

    Yes Stuart, every time I visit Canada it reveals more and more layers of interest and difference. It really is an exceptional country isn’t it. You’d love Cooks Tavern – and the rest of the site 🙂

    Posted on October 16, 2017 at 12:27 pm #
  12. From Heather Cowper:

    What a fun day out – perhaps you could settle into this lifestyle and become farmer Zoe, bake bread and brew beer!

    Posted on October 23, 2017 at 11:55 am #
  13. From Zoe Dawes:

    Somehow that sounds very appealing now Heather!

    Posted on October 23, 2017 at 2:05 pm #
  14. From Karen:

    Another fabulous post about this part of Canada Zoe – and a part I’ve not yet visited too! Lovely write up and photos! Karen

    Posted on October 24, 2017 at 7:39 am #
  15. From Zoe Dawes:

    Thanks Karen. It’s great reading about all the different places we have visited isn’t it. Must admit, Ottawa was a very pleasant surprise and hope this encourages more people to visit 🙂

    Posted on October 26, 2017 at 11:15 am #
  16. From Barry Stephen:

    Looks an outstanding location to learn anout aspects of Canadian history while having a great day out.

    Posted on October 27, 2017 at 8:27 am #
  17. From Zoe Dawes:

    You’re absolutely right Barry. We learnt a lot in the most entertaining way and loved the whole day out. Great excursion from Ottawa.

    Posted on October 30, 2017 at 11:04 am #

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